Thank You

Thank you to all who joined us in Regina for two days of learning, information sharing and exploring ‘what works’. Please see speaker presentations and conference highlights below.

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Event Photos

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Presentations

November 15th

8:20am

Keynote: Framing the Discussion – The Burning Platform
James Hughes

9:20am

Keynote: The Importance of Knowing What Works (and What Doesn’t)
Dr. David Halpern

10:30-12:00pm

Break Out Sessions

1] Plugging the Gap: Building the Supply of Evidence

Hanna Azemati

Dr. Jen Gold

Stephanie Lee

James Turner

2] Mobilizing and Applying Evidence: Making Evidence Accessible, Understandable and Useful

Dr. Jonathan Breckon

Nerys Thomas

Sasha Tregebov

3] Innovation and Experimentation in Canada

Ursula Gobel -EN | Ursula Gobel -FR

Jeremiah Hurley

Samantha Tattersall

4] Data in Practice: Examining Data Systems at Work

Robyn Blackadar

Yvan Clermont

Jonathan Dewar

Tris Lumley

1:00-2:30pm

Break Out Sessions

1] Evidence and Outcomes Funding

Colleen Ebbitt

Hanna Azetimi

Adam Jagelewski

2] Using Evidence in Real Life: What Does Meaningful Engagement Look Like In Practice?

Dr. Jen Gold

Stephanie Lee

Diane Roussin

Sarah Schulman

3] Delivering What Works: Transitioning to a What Works Centre Approach

Dr. Jonathan Breckon

Nerys Thomas

James Turner

4] Supporting the Path to Outcomes: Enabling Non-Profits as a Key Service Delivery Partner to Government

Ron Anderson

Lynn Barr-Telford

Dr. Chad Nilson

2:45-4:15pm

Break Out Sessions

1] Evidence in Action: Fostering Integrated Social Practice in Canada

Sara Austin, Dr. Daniel Garfinkel, Carrie Sanders

2] Building Effective Funding Models

No presentations available

3] Data in Practice

See 10:30am session above for presentation links

4] Mobilizing and Applying Evidence: Making Evidence Accessible, Understandable and Useful

James Turner

Nerys Thomas

See 10:30am session above for presentation links

Sasha Tregebov

See 10:30am session above for presentation links

4:30-5:15pm

Keynote: Making it Happen: Delivering Integrated Social Practice in Canada

Sheldon Kennedy

November 16th

8:35am

Keynote: Data is the Fuel of Change

Mark MacLeod

Evan White

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Resources

Background Papers

Mowat Research

 

Additional Resources

 

Community Safety and Well-Being: Concept Practice and Alignment

Dr. Chad Nilson (2018)

Child and youth advocacy centres: A change in practice that can change a lifetime

Christina L. Shaffer, Tanya D. Smith & Amy E. Ornstein
(2018)

Understanding the Development and Impact of Child Advocacy Centres (CACs)

Research and Statistics Division,
Department of Justice Canada
(2018)

Mapping the Standards of Evidence used in UK social policy

Alliance for Useful Evidence
Puttick, R. (2018)

Evidence for good: How charities use evidence to boost their influence and impact

Alliance for Useful Evidence
Taylor-Collins, E. (2018)

The What Works Network: Five Years On

UK Cabinet Office (2018)

Using Data to Make More Rapid Progress in Addressing Difficult U.S. Social Problems

John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University
Liebman, Jeffrey B. (2017)

Evidence-based policy development: A framework and its application

University of Regina Johnson Shoyama School of Public Policy
Sheikh, M. (2016)

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About the Conference

The Community Safety Knowledge Alliance and The Mowat Centre’s Not-for-Profit Research Hub are hosting the Innovation in Evidence Conference, a two-day event that will bring leaders and innovators in evidence-informed policymaking together to share emerging trends, discuss lessons learned, and provide fresh insight into the challenges facing policymakers, practitioners, researchers and academics in their quest to determine ‘what works’.

The event will identify tangible and practical examples of innovative approaches worldwide to inform the development of new types of evidence institutions in a Canadian context. The approach will leverage local expertise, build on past initiatives, and bring together a diverse range of leaders, funders, and investors from across Canada and around the world.

Topics covered include:

  • best practices in generating, translating, and adopting evidence;
  • exploring what meaningful engagement with policymakers and practitioners looks like in practice;
  • the role of data and data sharing in evidence-informed decision-making;
  • opportunities to support non-profits in their path to outcomes;
  • embedding evidence institutions in outcomes funding arrangements such as social impact bonds; and
  • profiling innovation and experimentation efforts in Canada.

 

The Mowat Centre will also release three reports related to the event:

In-depth social issue and sector mapping report

This report will include availability and gaps of evidence on various social issue areas; alignment on current policy priorities; and existing sector leadership.

A context setting paper

To be provided in advance of the conference to help inform and guide discussions.

A post-conference paper

Summarizing findings from the event and identifies ‘made-in-Canada’ solutions aligned to global trends and local realities.

View the agenda for more info

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Agenda

(subject to change)
View Agenda as PDF

 

November 15th

 

7:00am

Registration & Breakfast

8:00am

Welcome & Introduction

Dr. Vianne Timmons
President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Regina

8:05am

Indigenous Welcome

Chief Cadmus Delorme
Cowessess First Nation

8:10am

Host Message

Cal Corley
Chief Executive Officer, Community Safety Knowledge Alliance

Lisa Lalande
Executive Lead, Mowat Centre’s Not-for-Profit Research Hub

8:15am

Message from the Government of Saskatchewan

Honourable Christine Tell
Ministry of Corrections and Policing

8:20am

Keynote: Framing the Discussion – The Burning Platform

Confirmed Speakers:

Andrew Parkin
Director, Mowat Centre

Release of Mowat Centre research mapping report. A review of the current social evidence ecosystem in Canada.

Matthew Mendelsohn
Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet for Results and Delivery, Privy Council Office

Stephen Huddart
President & CEO, McConnell Foundation

Dale McFee
Deputy Minister, Corrections & Policing, Government of Saskatchewan

Presentation on local evidence ecosystem, including current challenges and opportunities and a description of future state – Integrated Social Practice.

9:20am

Keynote: The Importance of Knowing What Works (and What Doesn’t)

Dr. Halpern will explore why empirical government matters and why evidence institutions like What Works Centres are needed. He will share the story of the UK What Works Centres, how far they have come and what more needs to be done, including collaborating across countries.

Dr. David Halpern
Chief Executive, The Behavioural Insights Team

10:15am

Coffee Break

10:30-12:00pm

Break Out Sessions

(choose one)

1] Plugging the Gap: Building the Supply of Evidence

Speakers will provide a review of different approaches to building the supply of evidence, including a look at opportunities for building the international evidence base, and will examine the rise and impact of experimental governments. (Examples of international collaborations – mentorship opportunities, key learning lessons, and opportunities for Canada – will be discussed).

Confirmed Presenters:

Hanna Azemati
Program Director, Harvard Kennedy School Government Performance Lab

Yvan Clermont
Director, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada

Dr. Jen Gold
Head of the What Works Team, Prime Minister’s Implementation Unit, UK Cabinet Office

Stephanie Lee
Director, Washington State Institute for Public Policy

James Turner
Deputy Chief Executive, Education Endowment Foundation

Facilitator:

Andrew Parkin
Director, The Mowat Centre

2] Mobilizing and Applying Evidence: Making Evidence Accessible, Understandable and Useful

This session will explore best practices and key learnings on translating evidence so that it is understandable and useful. It will include a focus on disseminating evidence based on strategies appropriate to end-users, as well as capacity building approaches. It will profile specific partnership and outreach programs in place to encourage the adoption of evidence.

Confirmed Presenters

Dr. Jonathan Breckon
Director, Alliance for Useful Evidence

Nerys Thomas
Head of Knowledge, Research and Practice, College of Policing

Sasha Tregebov
Principal Advisor, The Behavioural Insights Team, Head of BIT Canada
Sasha will explore the behavioural and cognitive barriers that limit policymakers and other stakeholders from implementing evidence-based approaches — and propose a set of “nudges” and other tactics that can help overcome these barriers.

Facilitator:

Anne White
Senior Policy Advisor, Government of Canada, Privy Council Office

3] Innovation and Experimentation in Canada

This session will profile some examples of innovative and/or experimental initiatives underway in Canada.

Confirmed Presenters:

Ursula Gobel
Associate Vice-President, Future Challenges, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council

Jeremiah Hurley
Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences, McMaster University

Samantha Tattersall
Assistant Secretary, Priorities and Planning, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Jean-Pierre Voyer
President and CEO, SRDC

Helen Yung
Artist/Researcher

Facilitator:

Sarah Doyle
Director of Policy and Research, Brookfield Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

4] Data in Practice: Examining Data Systems at Work

Speakers will draw on lessons learned from real data systems in Canada, the USA and the UK. Presentations will include information on collaborative data infrastructures, data privacy considerations, enabling legislative and regulatory environments, Indigenous data considerations, and capacity-building needs for data collection, sharing, analysis and use.

Confirmed Presenters:

Robyn Blackadar
President & CEO, PolicyWise for Children & Families

Yvan Clermont
Director, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada

Jonathan Dewar
Executive Director, First Nations Information Governance Centre

Tris Lumley
Director, Innovation & Development, New Philanthropy Capital (NPC)

Facilitator:

Adam Jog
Policy Associate, The Mowat Centre

12:00-1:00pm

Lunch

1:00-2:30pm

Break Out Sessions

(choose one)

1] Evidence and Outcomes Funding

You need evidence for outcomes and outcomes for social finance. Join us as speakers profile various programs (such Investment Contract Readiness, GO Lab, and Outcomes Funds) in the USA and UK designed to build the capacity for governments to improve the results they achieve for their citizens. They will also explore the question what role, if any, could evidence institutions like What Works Centre play in supporting outcomes funding in Canada.

Confirmed Presenters:

Colleen Ebbitt
Senior Policy Advisor, Investment Finance Specialist, Government Inclusive Economy Unit

Hanna Azetimi
Program Director, Harvard Kennedy School Government Performance Lab

Adam Jagelewski
Director, MaRS Centre for Impact Investing

Facilitator:

James Hughes
Executive Lead, Government and Partner Relations, McConnell Foundation

2] Using Evidence in Real Life: What Does Meaningful Engagement Look Like In Practice?

Using practical examples, speakers will present different strategies used in the UK, USA, and Canada to better link research with practice. It will explore the concept of ‘meaningful engagement’ with regards to policymakers as well as frontline service delivery staff.

Confirmed Presenters:

Dr. Jen Gold
Head of the What Works Team, Prime Minister’s Implementation Unit, UK Cabinet Office

Stephanie Lee
Director, Washington State Institute for Public Policy

Diane Roussin
Project Director, Winnipeg Boldness Project

Sarah Schulman
Lead of Social Impact, InWithForward

Facilitator:

Joanne Cave
Social Policy Researcher

3] Delivering What Works: Transitioning to a What Works Centre Approach

This session will examine various design elements for creating or transitioning existing evidence institutions to What Works Centres. Topics will include: organizational structures, governance models, building effective cross-sector partnerships, establishing standards of evidence, funding models, and more. It will include a presentation of the What Works Centre Incubator in the U.K. with specific examples of the development and implementation process. As well as highlight current efforts to set a uniform standard of evidence in the UK, highlighting challenges and opportunities.

Confirmed Presenters:

Dr. David Halpern
Chief Executive, The Behavioural Insights Team

Dr. Jonathan Breckon
Director, Alliance for Useful Evidence, Nesta

Nerys Thomas
Head of Knowledge, Research and Practice, College of Policing

James Turner
Deputy Chief Executive, Education Endowment Foundation

Facilitator:

Lisa Lalande
Executive Lead, Mowat Centre’s Not-For-Profit Research Hub

4] Supporting the Path to Outcomes: Enabling Non-Profits as a Key Service Delivery Partner to Government

Charities and non-profit organizations are the program and service delivery partner of choice for federal, provincial-territorial, and municipal governments. To build the evidence base in social policy requires building the capacity of charities and non-profits in measurement, data, and creating enabling legislation. Could explore how non-profit organizations can set expectations, design processes, and engage with stakeholders to improve outcomes.

Confirmed Presenters:

Ron Anderson
Assistant Deputy Minister, Community Safety & Wellbeing, Corrections & Policing, Government of Saskatchewan

Lynn Barr-Telford
Director General, Statistics Canada

Dr. Chad Nilson
Community Engaged Scholar/Advisor, Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science and Justice Studies, University of Saskatchewan

Facilitator:

Karen Pitre

2:30-2:45pm

Break to Change Sessions

2:45-4:15pm

Break Out Sessions

(choose one)

1] Evidence in Action: Fostering Integrated Social Practice in Canada

Efforts are underway in Alberta to create a “horizontal” cross-government and coordinated approach that offers locally-relevant, targeted human services interventions that are focused on improving outcomes to transform the lives of its highest needs individuals and families, and delivering value-for-money to ensure budget sustainability. Presenters will discuss their experience in developing integrated social practice from a national, provincial, and local lens, outlining key lessons learned and how government, private, and philanthropic funders can help scale this approach more broadly across Canada.

Confirmed Presenters:

Sara Austin
CEO, Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre

Dr. Daniel Garfinkel
Psychologist, Child Abuse Service at Alberta Children’s Hospital

Carrie Sanders
Policy Specialist, Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre

Facilitator:

Raequel Giles
Director of Continuous Improvement and Innovation, Corrections and Policing, Government of Saskatchewan

2] Building Effective Funding Models

Speakers will share insights and key learnings on funding models from the UK, USA and Canada. The session will include a review of what is realistically required to scale up existing evidence institutions to What Works Centres, how to build effective cross-sector partnerships, and the role of research councils and foundations in supporting their long-term sustainability.

Confirmed Presenters:

Jon Baron
VP of Evidence-Based Policy, Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Jonathan Breckon
Director, Alliance for Useful Evidence, Nesta

James Hughes
Executive Lead, Government and Partner Relations, McConnell Foundation

Facilitator:

Anne White
Senior Policy Advisor, Government of Canada, Privy Council Office

3] Data in Practice: Examining Data Systems at Work

This session will explore best practices and key learnings on translating evidence so that it is understandable and useful. It will include a focus on disseminating evidence based on strategies appropriate to end-users, as well as capacity building approaches. It will profile specific partnership and outreach programs in place to encourage the adoption of evidence.

Confirmed Presenters:

Robyn Blackadar
President & CEO, PolicyWise for Children & Families

Yvan Clermont
Director, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada

Jonathan Dewar
Executive Director, First Nations Information Governance Centre

Tris Lumley
Director, Innovation & Development, New Philanthropy Capital (NPC)

Facilitator:

Sarah Doyle
Director of Policy and Research, Brookfield Institute for Innovation + Entrepreneurship

4] Mobilizing and Applying Evidence: Making Evidence Accessible, Understandable and Useful

This session will explore best practices and key learnings on translating evidence so that it is understandable and useful. It will include a focus on disseminating evidence based on strategies appropriate to end-users, as well as capacity building approaches. It will profile specific partnership and outreach programs in place to encourage the adoption of evidence.

Confirmed Presenters:

Nerys Thomas
Head of Knowledge, Research and Practice, College of Policing

James Turner
Deputy Chief Executive, Education Endowment Foundation

Sasha Tregebov
Principal Advisor, The Behavioural Insights Team, Head of BIT Canada

Sasha will explore the behavioural and cognitive barriers that limit policymakers and other stakeholders from implementing evidence-based approaches — and propose a set of “nudges” and other tactics that can help overcome these barriers.

Facilitator:

Betty Ferreira
Founder and Principal Consultant, ReStructure Consulting

4:15-4:30pm

Break to Change Sessions

4:30-5:15pm

Keynote: Making it Happen: Delivering Integrated Social Practice in Canada

Sheldon Kennedy
Director – Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre and Co-founder – Respect Group Inc.

Mr. Kennedy will explore why Canada needs a new approach to tackling complex social problems, what efforts are already underway, and what needs to be done to scale them out across the country.

5:15–7:15pm

Cocktail Reception

November 16th

 

7:00am

Breakfast Available

8:00am

Keynote

Chief Cadmus Delorme
Cowessess First Nation

8:35am

Keynote: Data is the Fuel of Change

This presentation will explore what it takes to transform data into policy change. It turns out that data is only one ingredient that matters, and not necessarily the most significant. The California Policy Lab sits between policymakers and researchers, bridging the gap that has often prevented data and evidence from improving lives.

Jon Baron
Vice President of Evidence-Based Policy, Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Mark MacLeod
President & CEO, ISM Canada

Evan White
Executive Director, California Policy Lab at UC Berkeley

Facilitator:

Dr. David Halpern
Chief Executive, The Behavioural Insights Team

10:00am

Coffee Break

10:15am

Facilitated Panel Discussion

Join a panel of speakers as they share their overall thoughts on the conference, highlighting key learnings and deriving important insights.

Lynn Barr-Telford
Director General, Health, Justice and Special Surveys Branch, Statistics Canada

Jonathan Breckon
Director, Alliance for Useful Evidence

Stephanie Lee
Director, Washington State Institute for Public Policy

James Turner
Deputy Chief Executive, Education Endowment Foundation

Facilitator:

TBD

11:30am

Closing of Public Event

12:00am-3:00pm

Fostering Integrated Social Practice

Closed (by invitation only) lunch and discussion

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Event Hosts

The Community Safety Knowledge Alliance (CSKA) is a non-profit that supports governments and others in the design, development and implementation of new and effective models of, and approaches to, community safety/wellbeing. Established in 2015 and based at the University of Saskatchewan, CSKA employs four lines of business (research, evaluation, technical guidance/support and professional development) to mobilize, facilitate and integrate research and the development of a knowledge base to inform how community safety-related work is organized and delivered. More particularly, its work:

  • informs and improves professional practices across the community safety system;
  • informs alignment within the sector; and
  • improves safety and wellbeing outcomes at the individual, family and community levels

cskacanada.ca

 

The Mowat Centre is an independent public policy think tank located at the Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy at the University of Toronto committed to non-partisan, evidence-based voice on public policy. It undertakes collaborative applied policy research, proposes innovative research-driven recommendations, and engages in public dialogue on Canada’s most important national issues.

As a part of Mowat Centre, the Mowat NFP research hub undertakes collaborative applied policy research on the not-for-profit sector. The Mowat Centre maintains strong partnerships with government and has a strong track- record bringing diverse stakeholders together to engage in productive dialogue on complex public policy issues facing the sector today. Mowat’s convening model sees the sharing of cutting-edge expertise and the exchange of perspectives across key stakeholders as critical research inputs ensuring recommendations are innovative, informed and actionable given relevant policy and sector realities.

The Mowat Centre and Mowat NFP have completed numerous research projects related to evidence-based policymaking. Please see the Resources section for a complete list and links to this work.

Mowat’s past work and diverse network will enable it to leverage its experience in this space, identify the critical issues to address, and offer insightful, practical solutions.

mowatcentre.ca

Mowat NFP mailing list subscribe

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Partners

 

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Location

Conference

University of Regina

College Avenue Campus
2155 College Ave, Regina, SK S4P 4V5

Hotel

The Hotel Saskatchewan

2125 Victoria Avenue, Regina, SK S4P 0S3
hotelsaskatchewan.ca
+1-306-522-7691

Special group rate for conference attendees: $156.00 CAD per night. Book by October 16th to access the group rate. More info

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Keynote Speakers

Dr. David Halpern

Chief Executive,
The Behavioural Insights Team

David Halpern is the Chief Executive of the UK’s Behavioural Insights Team and Board Director. He has led the team since its inception in 2010. Prior to that, David was the founding Director of the Institute for Government in the UK and between 2001 and 2007 was the Chief Analyst at the Prime Minister’s Strategy Unit. David was also appointed as the What Works National Advisor in July 2013. He supports the What Works Network and leads efforts to improve the use of evidence across government. Before entering government, David held tenure at Cambridge and posts at Oxford and Harvard. He has written several books and papers on areas relating to behavioural insights and wellbeing, including Social Capital (2005), the Hidden Wealth of Nations (2010), Inside the Nudge Unit (2015) and co-author of the MINDSPACE report.

Chief Cadmus Delorme

Cowessess First Nation

Chief Cadmus Delorme is a citizen of Cowessess First Nation. Graduating from Cowessess Community Education Centre, Chief Delorme moved away from Cowessess to pursue experience and higher learning. After achieving a Undergrad Degree at the First Nations University of Canada and a Masters Degree at the Johnson Shoyama School of Public Policy, Chief Delorme moved home and became Chief.

Stephen Huddart

President & CEO McConnell Foundation

Stephen Huddart is President and CEO of The J.W. McConnell Family Foundation, a national private foundation based in Montreal, with additional staff in Vancouver, Toronto and Ottawa. The Foundation has played a leading role in developing social innovation and impact investing in Canada as a founding partner of Social Innovation Generation (SiG). McConnell’s other initiatives include Innoweave, The McConnell Reconciliation Initiative, Cities for People, RECODE and Well Ahead. Stephen serves on the Boards of Pearson College UWC. He is currently a member of the Government of Canada’s Social Innovation and Social Finance Strategy Co-Creation Steering Group. Stephen has worked as a social innovator and entrepreneur in the private, public and community sectors.

Sheldon Kennedy

Director – Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre and Co-founder – Respect Group Inc.

Sheldon Kennedy won a Memorial Cup, World Junior Gold Medal and skated for three teams in eight-year NHL career. He is best known for his courageous decision to charge his Major Junior Hockey league coach with sexual assault for the abuse he suffered over a five year period while a teenager under his care. Through this disclosure, and the important work that Sheldon continues to do, he has become an inspiration to millions of abuse survivors around the world.

Sheldon has been instrumental in bringing governments, public and private sector partners together to work collaboratively to influence policy change and improve the way child abuse is handled. He has influenced changes in Canadian law and has taken his message to the International Olympic Committee and the US Senate.

Sheldon is the Lead Director at the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre, the first-of-its-kind in Canada, offering full wrap-around services for victims of child abuse. He is also the Co-Founder of Respect Group, which provides empowering online abuse, bullying and harassment prevention education to sport organizations, schools and the workplace.

Dale McFee

Deputy Minister,
Corrections & Policing, Saskatchewan Ministry of Justice

In September 2012, after 26 years as a police officer in Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, including nine years as the Chief of Police for the Prince Albert Police Service Dale McFee was appointed as Deputy Minister of Corrections and Policing in the Ministry of Justice for the Saskatchewan government.

Dale has considerable small to mid-size business experience and lectured extensively on leadership and change management nationally and internationally to private and public sectors. Dale is a renowned, engaging and impactful speaker with first-hand knowledge and expertise in policing, community engagement, data and analytics, and social finance and impact investing. He is a former member of Entrepreneurs International and served in the capacity of moderator for groups of business leaders within Saskatchewan.

Dale has received several commendations in his related fields including being appointed and promoted to officer within the Order of Merit within police services by the Governor General of Canada. He has received a provincial policing leadership award for “Leadership in Multi-Agency Community Mobilization”. He is a recognized Governor General Leadership alumnus and a former citizen of the year within his home community.

From 2011 to 2014, respectively he served as President and Past President of the Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police. He has previously held the positions of President of the Saskatchewan Association of Chiefs of Police, President of the Saskatchewan Federation of Police Officers, and Director of the Canadian Police Association.

Dale is married with three daughters and is an active member in his community; he has considerable Board experience including three years as a member of the Parkland Health Board. He is the Past President and current Vice President of the Western Hockey League’s Prince Albert Raiders.

Mark MacLeod

President and CEO, ISM Canada

Mark MacLeod is an experienced organizational leader, consultant, and entrepreneur. He has over 28 years of executive experience with 5 different companies specializing in transformation and growth in traditional and knowledge based organizations. Mark has won various awards throughout his 28-year career and has served on various committees and boards in the innovation, arts, and not for profit sector.

Mark’s entrepreneurial spirit began in 1988 as he was the driving force behind a technology start-up company, Software 2000 that was sold to Systemhouse in 1997. In 2002, Mark was appointed the President and CEO of Information Services Corporation and for five years led the turnaround of this Crown Corporation. A move to Saskatoon in 2008 provided Mark the opportunity to accept the role of President and CEO of Superior Cabinets, Western Canada’s largest manufacturer of designer kitchens and cabinets.

Mark is a Regina native and in 2013, accepted the position of President and CEO of ISM Canada and moved back to Regina. ISM is the province’s largest IT company, with close to 1,000 employees and is a wholly owned subsidiary of IBM Canada.

Mark graduated from the University of Regina with a Bachelor in Science. He lives with his wife Carla in Regina and has two grown daughters who reside in Saskatoon.

matthew-mendelsohn

Matthew Mendelsohn

Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet for Results and Delivery,
Privy Council Office

Matthew Mendelsohn is the Deputy Secretary to the Cabinet for Results and Delivery in the Privy Council Office, leading the federal government’s Results and Delivery Unit and Impact and Innovation Unit.

Prior to returning to the federal public service, Matthew was the founding Director of the Mowat Centre, a public policy think tank in the School of Public Policy & Governance at the University of Toronto. During that time he published and lectured widely on government transformation, democratic institutions and intergovernmental politics.

Matthew is a former Deputy Minister and Associate Secretary to the Cabinet with the Ontario government and a former Senior Advisor in the federal government’s Privy Council Office.

Matthew received his B.A. from McGill University and Ph.D. from the l’Université de Montréal, and held a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of British Columbia. He was a tenured faculty member in the Department of Political Studies at Queen’s University for 10 years and has been an active volunteer board member for many not-for-profit organizations that support community engagement and improved social and economic outcomes.

Andrew Parkin

Director,
Mowat Centre

Andrew Parkin is the Director of the Mowat Centre. Andrew has previously held a variety of positions including Director General of the Council of Ministers of Education Canada (CMEC), Associate Executive Director and Director of Research and Program Development at the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation, and Co-Director of the Centre for Research and Information on Canada.

Evan White

Executive Director,
California Policy Lab at UC Berkeley

Evan White is the founding Executive Director of the California Policy Lab at UC Berkeley. His career in public service has been dedicated to synthesizing complex information to solve hard policy problems. Prior to joining CPL, he served as a Senior Advisor to Richard Cordray, the first Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. During his tenure at CFPB, Evan led initiatives on a broad portfolio of issues ranging from fintech and consumer lending to debt collection and financial empowerment. Evan’s expertise also centers on housing and discrimination policy and he served as Director of Fair Housing for Project Sentinel, northern California’s largest fair housing nonprofit. Evan holds a joint degree in Law and Public Policy (JD/MPP) from UC Berkeley, during which he clerked for the California Supreme Court, the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, and the White House Office of Management and Budget. He holds a BA in Political Science and Africana Studies from Vassar College.

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Special Guests

Ron Anderson

Assistant Deputy Minister, Community Safety & Wellbeing, Corrections & Policing, Government of Saskatchewan

In November 2012, Ron began his tenure with the Government of Saskatchewan, working in the Ministry of Corrections and Policing as the Executive Director of Strategic Systems and Innovation. In 2015, he was promoted to Assistant Deputy Minister. Prior to this, for about 12 years Ron worked in the private sector in the Information Technology field as well as in the police sector with the Prince Albert Police Service.

Ron believes that data on its own is not the solution to the many issues plaguing human service systems. As a member of Statistics Canada’s Liaison Officer Committee supporting the National Justice Statistics Institute, Ron is guiding advanced analytics and microsimulation in carving out new opportunities to inform early interventions that can impact both client pathways and the delivery of social programs.

In 2012, Ron became an alumnus of the CACP Institute for Strategic International Studies and travelled to Colombia and Chile as part of the Full Circle Community Safety research project.

Sara Austin

CEO,
Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre

Sara is a world class champion for children, with 20 years of global and Canadian experience in the charitable sector. She was recently appointed CEO of the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre. As the Founder and Lead Director of the Board for Children First Canada, Sara continues to lead a national movement to make Canada the best place in the world for kids to grow up.

In her previous role as the Director of the President’s Office of World Vision Canada, Sara was the chief advisor to the President and Board of Directors; she also led strategic initiatives for the wellbeing of children and advanced workplace equity, diversity and inclusion. Sara has also been a Lecturer in Child Rights at Mount Royal University.

Sara has helped change the lives of the world’s most vulnerable children. Her leadership of a global campaign to strengthen international laws resulted in the UN General Assembly adopting groundbreaking legislation which allows children or their advocates to file complaints against their government for violations of their rights. She drafted the protocol during her graduate studies at Oxford, and her efforts culminated in April 2014, when Sara delivered a speech at the UN Headquarters as the law went into effect.

She has also shaped Canadian public policy efforts, including testifying before Senate and Parliamentary Committees. In addition, Sara has led innovative programs on birth registration in Latin America and cutting edge research on girls’ vulnerability to AIDS in Africa. In 2015, Sara broke new ground by launching Strong Women, Strong World, a campaign to empower women and girls.

Hanna Azemati

Program Director,
Harvard Kennedy School Government Performance Lab

Hanna Azemati is a Program Director with the Harvard Kennedy School’s Government Performance Lab (GPL). She directs the GPL’s role with Bloomberg Philanthropies’ What Works Cities initiative, helping cities improve the results of their highest priority procurements and contracts. She also oversees the GPL’s engagements with New York City and has helped New York State develop and launch its first social impact bond project. Before joining the GPL, Hanna was a financial analyst at Citigroup in New York City and worked in international development with Kiva Microfunds in Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda. She earned her bachelor’s degree in economics with a minor in government from Dartmouth College and her master’s degree in international relations from Yale University.

Jon Baron

VP of Evidence-Based Policy,
Laura and John Arnold Foundation

Jon Baron is the Vice President of Evidence-Based Policy at the Laura and John Arnold Foundation – a nonprofit philanthropic foundation. He leads the Foundation’s strategic investments in rigorous research aimed at growing the body of evidence-based social programs, and scaling those shown to produce meaningful improvements in people’s lives.

Mr. Baron is the founder and former president of the Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that worked with federal policy officials from 2001 to 2015 to advance important evidence-based reforms, many of which were enacted into law and policy.
He was twice nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate to serve on the National Board for Education Sciences (2004-2011), and was the Board’s chairman during the last year of his term. He has also served on the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Capitalizing on Science, Technology, and Innovation; and is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration, an Honorary Fellow of the Academy of Experimental Criminology, and a recipient of the Society for Prevention Research’s Public Service Award.

Mr. Baron holds a law degree from Yale Law School, a Master’s degree in Public Affairs from Princeton University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Rice University.

Lynn Barr-Telford

Director General,
Health, Justice and Special Surveys Branch, Statistics Canada

Lynn Barr-Telford is the Director General responsible for the Health, Justice and Special Surveys Branch (HJSSB) at Statistics Canada. The HJSSB provides accurate, timely and relevant information to health and justice decision-makers at all levels of government, to non-governmental organizations, to researchers and to the Canadian public. The HJSSB portfolio includes such large survey and administrative programs as the Canadian Community Health Survey, the Canadian Health Measures Survey, the Vital Statistics program, and the Canadian Cancer Registry.

Lynn holds a Masters Degree from Carleton University and has been with Statistics Canada for over 25 years. She has extensive experience in social statistics program management at the executive level.

Robyn Blackadar

President & CEO,
PolicyWise for Children & Families

Robyn has served as President and CEO of PolicyWise for Children & Families since 2012 and describes this as her most rewarding role in over 25 years of working in Alberta’s social and health system. Robyn holds a BA in Psychology from the University of Calgary, an MBA from the University of Alberta, and has a background in knowledge utilization and public policy decision-making. Robyn has grown PolicyWise into becoming the “go-to” organization for collaborative cross-sector approaches to generate and mobilize evidence for child, family, and community well-being. She advances innovative data linkage and analysis initiatives such as the Child and Youth Data Laboratory (CYDL) and Secondary Analysis to Generate Evidence (SAGE), and research and evaluation initiatives in mental health, resilience, early childhood development, disabilities, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, youth transitions, child intervention, service integration and community development. Robyn balances her commitment to the PolicyWise team and professional life, with the enjoyment of time spent with family, friends, and volunteering in the community.

Dr. Jonathan Breckon

Director,
Alliance for Useful Evidence, Nesta

Jonathan Breckon has 15 years experience in policy, research and public affairs. His expertise lies particularly in brokering relationships between decision-makers and researchers from across disciplines – social science, science and the humanities. He joined Nesta from Arts and Humanities Research Council where he was Director of Policy and Public Affairs. He has also worked at the Royal Geographical Society, the British Academy, Universities UK and as a consultant developing quantitative skills in the social sciences. He is a board member of the Society for Evidence-Based Policing, and is Honorary Senior Lecturer at University College London. He is the lead on hosting the ‘incubation’ of the UK’s latest What Works Centre – on children’s social care.

Yvan Clermont

Director,
Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada

Mr. Yvan Clermont is the Director of the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics at Statistics Canada. In this position, he is responsible for planning and directing the activities related to the production, integration, analysis of data related to the criminal system and public safety. Mr. Clermont is directing a highly specialized and professional staff providing crime and justice statistical information and authoritative expertise and advice to the governments, non-profit organizations and institutions.

Over the years, Mr. Clermont has worked in several areas related to social statistics at Statistics Canada. Before being the Director of the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, he directed Demography Division. He also was the Assistant Director responsible for the Labour Force Survey and the Assistant Director of the Centre for Education Statistics where he directed the design and implementation of various education surveys and the analysis and dissemination of education indicators. Prior to that, Mr. Clermont was the International coordinator of the Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey that took place in several countries. Over the years, Mr. Clermont has specialized in the design and conduct of large-scale ad hoc surveys to meet emerging public policy issues. His own work has included studies in the implementation of skills tests in large-scale surveys, social research and the design of various indicators in the field of social statistics. He has also written articles in the field of skills assessments and criminology.

Mr. Clermont graduated from the University of Montréal in Economics in 1987 (Bachelor of Science) and from Les Hautes Études Commerciales in Applied Economics in 1990 (Master of Science).

Jonathan Dewar

Executive Director,
First Nations Information Governance Centre

Jonathan Dewar is the Executive Director at the First Nations Information Governance Centre and holds a PhD focused on healing and reconciliation from the School of Indigenous and Canadian Studies at Carleton University. He has been recognized as a leader in healing and reconciliation and Indigenous health and wellbeing education, policy, and research for over a decade and has published extensively on these subjects, with a specialization in the role of the arts in healing and reconciliation. He also holds an appointment as Adjunct Research Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University.

Colleen Ebbitt

Senior Policy Advisor, Investment Finance Specialist,
Government Inclusive Economy Unit

Colleen is a Senior Policy Advisor and Investment Finance Specialist in the U.K. government’s Inclusive Economy Unit, a specialised team that works across the public, private and social sectors to increase the flow of private investment to improve delivery of public services and enable innovative responses to societal challenges. She leads the government’s work on innovative finance – creating blended public and commercial investment funds to scale social ventures. Colleen spent 9 years as a Vice President private banker at J.P. Morgan in the United States and Switzerland. She was a 2015 LGT Impact Ventures Fellow working on strategic growth initiatives for mothers2mothers, an HIV/AIDs charity, in Cape Town, South Africa.

Dr. Daniel Garfinkel

Psychologist,
Child Abuse Service at Alberta Children’s Hospital

Dr. Daniel Garfinkel obtained his Ph.D. in Child Clinical Psychology from the University of Toronto. Since 2010, Daniel has worked as a Psychologist in the Child Abuse Service at Alberta Children’s Hospital. In 2013, Daniel assumed the role of Clinical Lead for therapeutic services provided at the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Center. Daniel holds a certification in Trauma-Focused CBT; he provides assessment and treatment to families with children who are exhibiting problematic sexual behavior; and he provides consultation to educators, medical professionals and other systems serving children with complex needs related to child maltreatment.

Dr. Jen Gold

Head of the What Works Team,
Prime Minister’s Implementation Unit, UK Cabinet Office

Jen Gold is Head of the UK Government’s What Works Team, based in the Cabinet Office. She was previously a Research Manager at the Institute for Government and a Senior Policy Associate at the University of Toronto’s Mowat Centre where she set up and led the government transformation research programme. She holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge and was a Visiting Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University.

Ursula Gobel

Associate Vice President,
Future Challenges, SSHRC

Ursula Gobel was appointed associate vice-president, future challenges, at SSHRC in April 2014. As a member of SSHRC’s senior management team, Ursula leads the development and implementation of strategies to identify and address future societal challenges for Canada in a global context, overseeing strategic foresight, stakeholder engagement, knowledge mobilization and partnership development functions, nationally and internationally.

Ursula joined SSHRC in 2007 as director of communications. In that role, she oversaw the development and implementation of strategic communications for SSHRC, as well as for several international programs, including the Canada Research Chairs, and the Canada Excellence Research Chairs, on behalf of Canada’s three federal research granting agencies.

Ursula brings over 30 years of experience in leadership and management across the public, private and not-for-profit sectors, including responsibility for marketing and communications at the National Gallery of Canada. She has extensive Board and volunteer experience with national and regional organizations, including the Institute for Public Administration of Canada, the Canadian Tourism Commission, the Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance, the Ottawa Economic Development Corporation, and the United Way.

Ursula holds executive leadership training from Queen’s University, and as well as business and economics diplomas from Algonquin College and John Abbott College.

James Hughes

Executive Lead,
Government and Partner Relations, McConnell Foundation

James Hughes is the Executive Lead, Government and Partner Relations for the McConnell Foundation. The McConnell Foundation is a Canadian leader in advancing systemic and organizational change through social innovation. Its key focus areas are ecological sustainability, Indigenous reconciliation and community wellbeing. James’ previous roles include Deputy Minister of Social Development for the Province of New Brunswick and Director General of the Old Brewery Mission, one of Canada’s largest organizations serving homeless people. His book, Early Intervention, on better ways to manage Canada’s social safety net, was published by Lorimer Canada in 2015. His next book, Beyond Shelters, an edited collection about the future of homeless shelters in Canada also published by Lorimer Canada, will appear in bookstores in October 2018.”

Dr. Jeremiah Hurley

Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences,
Professor and former Chair in the Department of Economics,
Member: Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, McMaster University

Jeremiah Hurley is Dean of the Faculty of Social Sciences, a professor in the Department of Economics, a member of the Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis, and a member of the Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact (HEI), all at McMaster University. His research on the economics of health and health care systems includes physician behaviour, funding models and resource association in health care, public and private roles in health care financing, financial incentives in health systems, equity in health systems, normative frameworks in health economics, and the application of experimental economic methods in health research. He has published in leading health economic, health policy, and health services research journals and is the author of the Canadian health economics textbook, Health Economics (McGraw-Hill Ryerson).

Professor Hurley has served in advisory capacities to health organizations in Canada and internationally, including the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-term Care, CIHR’s Institute of Health Services and Policy, the Health Council of Canada, Health Canada, the Canadian Institute for Health Information, the U.S. Physician Payment Review Commission, the World Bank, and the OECD.

Adam Jagelewski

Lead Executive,
MaRS Centre for Impact Investing

Adam Jagelewski co-founded the Centre for Impact Investing at MaRS Discovery District and is currently the Executive Lead. He develops alternative funding models for nonprofit and for-profit social ventures. Adam advises several governments, financial institutions and large charitable organizations across Canada.

Adam has spent his career in the social impact field in Canada. Prior to his roles at MaRS, Adam was a consultant for PricewaterhouseCoopers, specializing in nonprofit performance management as well as Aboriginal community investment.

Adam is a recognized leader on topics of social finance and emerging models like Social Impact Bonds. He sits on several advisory boards in Canada and globally and holds a degree in Economics from the University of British Columbia.

Stephanie Lee

Director,
Washington State Institute for Public Policy

Stephanie Lee is the Director of the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP), a nonpartisan applied research group that works at the direction of the Washington State legislature. WSIPP conducts rigorous research to inform policy decisions using a variety of techniques, including impact evaluation and benefit-cost analysis. Stephanie began her research career at a community-based charity in the United Kingdom, where her interest in evidence-based prevention strategies was sparked. She joined WSIPP in 2007, and has focused since then on investigating the societal benefits and costs of programs and policies across a wide variety of public policy areas, including child welfare, education, criminal justice, and public health. She has led the development of the WSIPP benefit-cost model and WSIPP’s collaboration with the Pew-MacArthur Results First Initiative, which provides support to states and counties across the United States as they work to incorporate research and economic evidence into public policymaking. Stephanie holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Trinity University and a master’s in experimental psychology from Washington University in St. Louis.

Tris Lumley

Director, Innovation & Development,
New Philanthropy Capital (NPC)

Tris leads NPC’s work on innovation, researching and developing innovative approaches, new models and new ventures to create significant, long-term contributions to the capability and capacity of the social sector. He also leads on developing NPC’s relationships with core funders—philanthropists, foundations and businesses who have a shared commitment to transforming the social sector to achieve its full potential.

Working with partners in the UK and globally, Tris develops initiatives to maximise the value of existing and emerging innovations in all sectors, through their application in the social sector. NPC’s focus within the area of innovation is on the use of digital technology and data to transform the delivery of activities, products and services, and to transform the relationships between funders and investors, the charities and social enterprises they support, and the people they all aim to serve.

Tris helped initiate and develop NPC’s Digital Transformation Programme, which is currently focused on creating practical collaborations on digital technology in areas like the youth sector and women’s empowerment, and the Inspiring Impact programme which aims to improve impact practice across the UK charity sector. He is also a board member of Social Value International, a member of the Leap of Reason Ambassadors Community, and is a regular speaker at international conferences in Europe, Asia, Australia and the U.S.

Before joining NPC in 2004, he worked in consulting, emerging technology research, and scientific and engineering innovation.

Dr. Chad Nilson

Community Engaged Scholar/Advisor, Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science and Justice Studies – University of Saskatchewan (NPC)

Dr. Chad Nilson is a Community-Engaged Scholar and advisor at the University of Saskatchewan’s Centre for Forensic Behavioural Science and Justice Studies. In that role, he serves as a community-based researcher, community developer and evaluator. As a multi-sector collaboration specialist, Nilson is one of Canada’s leading experts on community safety and well-being. His contributions from both a measurement and development perspective have made an impact in several Canadian provinces and First Nations—both urban and rural.

Diane Roussin

Project Director,
Winnipeg Boldness Project

Diane Roussin is a dedicated community leader and a proud member of the Skownan First Nation. Diane has worked tirelessly for over two decades with organizations and projects that respect the ability and the right of Indigenous families, children and individuals to care for themselves and thrive. Most recently, she became the Project Director for The Winnipeg Boldness Project, a research and development project focusing on improving outcomes for children in the North End of Winnipeg through social lab processes. Diane holds Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Social Work degrees. She is a cherished member of a large extended family and a loving mother of two daughters whom she adores.

Carrie Sanders

Policy Specialist, Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Centre

Carrie Sanders is the Practice Specialist at the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Center in Calgary, Alberta. Carrie began her career in the area of Child Protection with the Alberta Government where she has remained for the past 20 years. She holds a BA from the University of Saskatchewan and a BSW/MSW from the University of Calgary. During her career in the area of Child Protection, she has remained passionate about the assessment of risk to children and the integration of services to better serve the needs of the clients she works with. Her work experience has often involved collaboration either as a Team Leader or front line worker in programs that are multidisciplinary teams, such as joint initiatives with the police or health. In September of 2016 Carrie was seconded from the Calgary and Area Children Services to work at the Sheldon Kennedy Child Advocacy Center in the role of Practice Specialist. In this role, she works in collaboration with all partner organizations to support, advance and ensure continuous improvement of the integrated model of practice.

Sarah Schulman

Lead of Social Impact, InWithForward

Sarah is a Founder of InWithForward, and its Social Impact Lead. As a sociologist, Sarah is fascinated by what makes individuals, families, and policymakers tick. She’s worked with federal, regional, and local governments in 6 countries to shift how policies are made and measured. From 2010-2012, Sarah co-ran InWithFor and worked with The Australian Centre for Social Innovation to launch 3 new social solutions including the award-winning Family by Family. From 2008-2009, Sarah was the Youth Project Lead at Participle, one of the first social design shops in the world.

She holds a Doctorate in Social Policy from Oxford University, where she was a Rhodes Scholar, and a Masters of Education from Stanford University. In 2015, Sarah became a Metcalf Foundation Innovation Fellow. This is Sarah’s fourth start-up organization.

Samantha Tattersall

Assistant Secretary,
Priorities and Planning, Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat

Samantha Tattersall was appointed to the position of Assistant Secretary of the Priorities and Planning Sector at Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS) in March 2017. In her role she is responsible for key planning and policy activities within the department that lay the foundation for government-wide management excellence.
Immediately prior to her current role, she was on an interchange assignment as a senior director at the Global Infrastructure Hub, a G20 initiative based in Sydney, Australia. Samantha has worked as an Executive Director within TBS with responsibility for files related to natural resources, agriculture, the Coast Guard, and the environment as well as spent many years at Infrastructure Canada, where she was integral in developing and delivering several key government infrastructure priorities and programs. Samantha began her career at the department of Human Resources Development Canada where she focused on the postsecondary education file.

Originally from Toronto, Ontario, Samantha has a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto and a master’s degree in public administration from Carleton University.

Nerys Thomas

Head of Knowledge, Research and Practice,
College of Policing

For four years Nerys has worked as the College of Policing’s Head of Knowledge, Research and Practice, helping the service to identify, share and use evidence about what works. Nerys has been working in policing and criminal justice research for 20 years and, prior to joining the College, held various roles in the Home Office, the Office for Criminal Justice Reform and the National Policing Improvement Agency. She has carried out and published research on issues ranging from vehicle crime and police investigations to use of forensics and intelligence and policing demand.

Nerys has been seconded to a government-led criminal justice reform project focusing on the Human Rights Act and was a member of the first Home Office task force sent to Macedonia to co-ordinate the evacuation of refugees from Kosovo. Before joining the Home Office, Nerys completed a Master of Science degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Wales, Cardiff.

Sasha Tregebov

Principal Advisor,
The Behavioral Insights Team

Sasha Tregebov is a Principal Advisor at the Behavioural Insights Team (BIT) and Head of BIT Canada. In addition to his role leading BIT’s Canadian practice, Sasha oversees BIT’s work with US municipalities through the What Works Cities initiative. Prior to joining BIT, Sasha was a management consultant at Deloitte, leading Deloitte’s behavioural insights capabilities and working with public sector organizations across Canada on strategy, innovation, and the application of human-centred design. He began his career as a policy advisor with the Government of Ontario. Sasha holds a Master’s degree in Public Policy and Administration from Ryerson University and a BA from UBC.

James Turner

Deputy Chief Executive,
Education Endowment Foundation

James is the Deputy Chief Executive of the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF), the English What Works Centre for Education. James has been involved in the EEF since its start, first leading the £125m bid to the Department for Education, then setting up the charity’s infrastructure and strategy, and latterly serving as a founding trustee. Prior to his role at EEF, James was the Director of Programmes and Partnerships at the leading social mobility charity The Sutton Trust, where he worked for ten years on policy, research and practical projects, and where he remains an advisor. James was also a founding trustee of the work experience charity PRIME and the Children’s University Trust. He is currently the Vice Chair of The Brilliant Club, one of the largest university access charities in English secondary schools, a governor of a comprehensive school and a member of the Board for the Centre for Homelessness Impact.

Jean Pierre Voyer

President and CEO, SRDC

Jean-Pierre Voyer has been President and CEO of the Social Research and Demonstration Corporation since 2006, providing general direction to a team of 35 researchers passionately engaged in social policy research, evaluation and experimentation. For 27 years, as a mission-oriented non-profit organisation, SRDC has been working with federal, provincial and territorial governments, foundations and other non-profit organisations to test the impact of new and existing programs with a view to raise the standards of evidence used in policymaking and program design.

From 2002 to 2006, Mr. Voyer was the assistant deputy minister in charge of the Policy Research Initiative, an organization responsible for conducting research on cross-cutting issues in support of the Government of Canada’s medium-term policy agenda. From 1994 to 2000, he was Director General of the Applied Research Branch at Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC) where he provided oversight for the department’s research program. He has also held positions at Finance Canada, the Privy Council Office, the National Union of Provincial Government Employees, and the Economic Council of Canada.

Mr. Voyer was Chairman of the OECD Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Committee from 1998 to 2000 and has served on advisory committees for SSHRC, the Ottawa University, and HRDC. He is currently a member of the Labour Market Information Council’s National Stakeholder Advisory Panel.

Mr. Voyer holds a Master’s degree in Economics from Queen’s University and an undergraduate degree in Economics from the Université de Montréal.

Helen Yung

Artist/Researcher

Helen is an interdisciplinary artist-researcher with the Culture of Cities Centre, a Board member with the Centre for Social Innovation, and a Salzburg Global Fellow. Combining performance, conceptual art, and social R&D, Helen works with immigrants and refugees to creatively transform conventional approaches to newcomer settlement. For over a decade, Helen has contributed to policy thinking, and civic and cultural actions for public benefit. Clients include Canadian Public Arts Funders, Metcalf Foundation, Toronto Arts Foundation, Canada Council for the Arts, Culture Days, Canadian Arts Coalition, and others. Helen’s artistic practice has been developed, produced, presented and supported through grants, commissions, and residencies by organizations in Canada, Australia, France, USA, UK, Austria, and Argentina. Helen has been nominated for the Ontario Premier’s Excellence in the Arts Award, and for the Toronto Dora Theatre awards (Outstanding Production, Scenic Design, Lighting Design).

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Facilitators

Joanne Cave

Social Policy Researcher

Joanne is a part-time Researcher for Mowat NFP, bringing her expertise in policy advocacy, impact evaluation and systems change. Located in Edmonton, Joanne is currently completing a J.D. at the University of Alberta Faculty of Law. She previously worked with the Government of Alberta and Caledon Institute of Social Policy on a range of social policy issues, including poverty reduction, early childhood development, gender equity and ageing populations. In her role with the Government of Alberta, Joanne contributed to the development and implementation of Alberta’s Social Policy Framework in 2013, which continues to be a guiding document for the Alberta Public Service. Joanne is a graduate of the University of Toronto and the University of Oxford, which she attended as a Rhodes Scholar while completing her Masters in Comparative Social Policy and Masters in Public Policy at the Blavatnik School of Government. Her graduate thesis focused on the role of policy networks in the transfer of social impact bonds from the United Kingdom to the United States.

Sarah Doyle

Director of Policy and Research,
Brookfield Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship

Sarah leads the development of the Institute’s research agenda and oversees the work of the Institute’s policy team.

Having worked on policy development both inside and outside government, Sarah sees a need for translators with the ability to bridge sectors and disciplines.

Sarah is committed to policy that supports inclusive growth. Prior to BII+E, Sarah was a Senior Manager at the Centre for Impact Investing at the MaRS Discovery District, where she was responsible for working with community, government and private sector stakeholders to develop and advance policy that unlocks the potential of the Canadian impact investing market.

Sarah also worked within Canada’s Privy Council Office, where she developed advice for the Prime Minister on a range of social policy issues. She has experience in refugee and asylum policy through a past position at Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

Sarah is a member of the Board of St. Stephen’s Community House and Chair of its Quality Committee.

She holds a Master of Science in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science, where she was a Commonwealth Scholar, and is a graduate of the McMaster University Arts and Science program.

Betty Ferreira

Founder and Principal Consultant,
ReStructure Consulting

Betty is a former Executive Director of several not-for-profit organizations and the founder and principal consultant of ReStructure Consulting, a niche consulting firm focusing on building the resilience of not-for-profit organizations so that they are better equipped to fulfill their mission.

She is passionate about transforming and modernizing organizations. Increasingly her transformation work focuses on modernizing not-for-profit organizations through strategic financial leadership, digital transformation, mergers and amalgamations, and radical organization-wide strategic turnaround transformation.

Late in her career, Betty earned her CPA, CMA designation in 2013 and achieved a Masters Certificate Lean Six Sigma Black Belt in 2016 to strengthen her capacity to assist not-for-profit organizations and funders.

Raequel Giles

Director of Continuous Improvement and Innovation,
Corrections and Policing, Government of Saskatchewan

Raequel began her tenure with the Government of Saskatchewan (GOS) in 1994, and has held administrative, managerial and leadership positions in a number of GOS ministries. In 2016, she was promoted to lead the Continuous Improvement and Innovation work in Corrections and Policing. Raequel believes improvement and innovation should be driven from the front-line from those directly connected with the ministry’s clients – this driver is essential to improving client outcomes.

James Hughes

Executive Lead,
Government and Partner Relations, McConnell Foundation

James Hughes is the Executive Lead, Government and Partner Relations for the McConnell Foundation. The McConnell Foundation is a Canadian leader in advancing systemic and organizational change through social innovation. Its key focus areas are ecological sustainability, Indigenous reconciliation and community wellbeing. James’ previous roles include Deputy Minister of Social Development for the Province of New Brunswick and Director General of the Old Brewery Mission, one of Canada’s largest organizations serving homeless people. His book, Early Intervention, on better ways to manage Canada’s social safety net, was published by Lorimer Canada in 2015. His next book, Beyond Shelters, an edited collection about the future of homeless shelters in Canada also published by Lorimer Canada, will appear in bookstores in October 2018.”

Adam Jog

Policy Associate,
Mowat Centre

Adam is a Policy Associate at the Mowat Centre, working closely with the Centre’s Not-for-Profit Research Hub (Mowat NFP). He holds a MA in sociology from The University of Western Ontario as well as a Research Analyst graduate certificate from Humber College. He has conducted strategic research and data analysis for not-for-profit organizations; prior to his current role at the Mowat Centre, Adam served as an Institutional Research and Planning Analyst with the Office of Research Services, Innovation and Entrepreneurship (ORSIE) at Durham College.

Lisa Lalande

Executive Lead,
Mowat Centre’s Not-for-Profit Research Hub

Lisa Lalande is the Executive Lead for the Mowat Centre’s Not-for-Profit Research Hub (Mowat NFP). She leads the development and execution of Mowat NFP’s research agenda. The hub’s research looks at long-standing structural, foundational, and systemic issues affecting the charitable and non-profit sector work together from a systems-lens.

Prior to this role, Lisa was on the executive management team at Lift Philanthropy Partners, a venture philanthropy organization that helps organizations increase their accountability, establish performance metrics, and improve their overall capacity to deliver social impact. For almost a decade, Lisa held a variety of senior management positions at Habitat for Humanity during a time of national and international strategic realignment. She led a cross-functional team in expanding the association’s domestic and international homebuilding activities, diversifying funding models and partnerships, establishing impact measurement approaches, and strengthening the Canadian association’s infrastructure. Lisa’s career also included working in retail banking and wealth management supporting proposed mergers and large-scale restructuring exercises.

Andrew Parkin

Director,
Mowat Centre

Andrew Parkin is the Director of the Mowat Centre. Andrew has previously held a variety of positions including Director General of the Council of Ministers of Education Canada (CMEC), Associate Executive Director and Director of Research and Program Development at the Canada Millennium Scholarship Foundation, and Co-Director of the Centre for Research and Information on Canada.

Karen Pitre

Consultant

Karen Pitre was the Special Advisor to the Premier on Community Hubs from 2015-2018. Based on input from the community and working with the Community Hubs Advisory Group, Karen developed the Community Hubs Strategy Framework and Action Plan. The Action Plan included 27 recommendations to support local communities and all 27 recommendations were adopted by the government.

Karen has extensive stakeholder consultation, strategic planning and project management experience. Her experience includes working at Metrolinx as the Strategic Advisor on Electrification, a complex project involving stakeholder consultations developed with the input from a Community Advisory Committee‎.

Karen has worked with the Toronto District School Board to establish the Toronto Lands Corporation where she developed a framework for the stewardship of surplus capital assets. She has worked with all three levels of government, including as part of her work with the Toronto 2008 Olympic Bid and with Waterfront Toronto. Karen was also the Founding Chair of the Toronto Sports Council. Prior to this, Karen worked as labour and employment lawyer in Toronto.

She has a LL.B. from the University of Windsor and a Bachelor of Applied Science in Chemical Engineering from the University of Toronto.

Anne White

Senior Policy Advisor, Government of Canada, Privy Council Office

Anne White is a senior advisor with the Privy Council Office Results and Delivery Unit and Impact and Innovation Unit. She is an alumnus of the Harvard Kennedy School’s Government Performance Lab where she helped the State of Michigan launch its first Pay for Success initiative. Prior to this, she launched the Government of Ontario’s exploration project on Social Impact Bonds and captured some of her learning in the Mowat Centre’s report “What Works: Proven Approaches to Poverty Alleviation.” She holds a Master of Public Administration from the London School of Economics and the Institut d’études politiques de Paris and is a graduate of the Ivey School of Business.

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Hosts

Cal Corley

Chief Executive Officer,
Community Safety Knowledge Alliance

Cal Corley is the Chief Executive Officer of the Community Safety Knowledge Alliance Inc. (CKSA), an innovative non-profit research and knowledge development centre that supports governments and others in the development, design and implementation of new models and approaches to community safety and wellbeing. A former RCMP Assistant Commissioner and head of the Canadian Police College, Cal has also served at the Privy Council Office’s Security and Intelligence Secretariat and at Public Safety Canada. He brings a broad range of domestic and international experience, combined with sound academic credentials to this role.

Lisa Lalande

Executive Lead,
Mowat Centre’s Not-for-Profit Research Hub

Lisa Lalande is the Executive Lead for the Mowat Centre’s Not-for-Profit Research Hub (Mowat NFP). She leads the development and execution of Mowat NFP’s research agenda. The hub’s research looks at long-standing structural, foundational, and systemic issues affecting the charitable and non-profit sector work together from a systems-lens.

Prior to this role, Lisa was on the executive management team at Lift Philanthropy Partners, a venture philanthropy organization that helps organizations increase their accountability, establish performance metrics, and improve their overall capacity to deliver social impact. For almost a decade, Lisa held a variety of senior management positions at Habitat for Humanity during a time of national and international strategic realignment. She led a cross-functional team in expanding the association’s domestic and international homebuilding activities, diversifying funding models and partnerships, establishing impact measurement approaches, and strengthening the Canadian association’s infrastructure. Lisa’s career also included working in retail banking and wealth management supporting proposed mergers and large-scale restructuring exercises.

Next Section